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Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the News Desk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Editor's note: This report includes descriptions of sexual assault.

Once one of Hollywood's most powerful men, whose very reputation could help determine the fate of the films he financed, Harvey Weinstein is set for a starring role on a very different kind of stage: The former megaproducer's criminal trial opens Monday in Manhattan, where Weinstein faces sexual assault charges that may land him in prison for a very long time.

Updated at 8:05 p.m. ET

Iraqis turned out in droves Saturday to mourn Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani and Iraqi militia commander Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, just a day and a half after both men were killed in a U.S. airstrike that has prompted vows of revenge from leaders in Tehran.

Less than a day after the U.S. killed a top Iranian military commander, assassinating Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani in an overnight drone strike outside Baghdad International Airport, the questions eddying around the world can be simplified to just one: How will Iran respond?

As hard as it may be to believe, the bushfires ravaging large swaths of Australia are likely to get worse in the coming days.

Ship happens.

That, at least, is one lesson to be learned from an accident Friday at the port in Cozumel, Mexico, where one Carnival cruise ship ran into another while trying to dock. Carnival Glory, a 952-foot vessel, raked the bow of the 963-foot Carnival Legend, which had been stationary in port when its counterpart made crunching, cacophonous contact.

The former CEO of a French telecommunications company has been sentenced to jail in connection with a series of employee suicides — with one worker taking their own life after describing "management by terror" at the firm.

The landmark ruling handed down Friday in a Paris courtroom caps the first time in France that a major company has been tried on a charge of "collective moral harassment" — and it delivered four months in jail and a fine of more than $16,000 for Didier Lombard, ex-CEO of the French phone and Internet provider now known as Orange.

Halfway across the world from Washington, D.C., where President Trump on Wednesday became just the third president in U.S. history to be impeached, Trump's counterpart in the Kremlin made clear that he has the American president's back.

During his annual marathon news conference in Moscow, Russian President Vladimir Putin dismissed the charges against Trump as "completely made up."

Updated at 1:22 p.m. ET

The family that owns Purdue Pharma pulled billions of dollars from the company after introducing its signature opioid medication, OxyContin, growing personally wealthy as the heavily marketed drug took on a significant role in a nationwide addiction crisis.

After months spent buffeted by anger and unrest at home, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has found some solace a little farther afield.

During Lam's third annual duty visit to Beijing on Monday, the embattled leader got public professions of support from Chinese President Xi Jinping and Premier Li Keqiang, with whom she also discussed the Hong Kong protests behind closed doors.

It's a lesson you learn as early as grade school: If you find yourself injured, threatened or otherwise in harm's way, just break out your phone and dial a simple, three-digit number: 911. After more than five decades, the 911 emergency call system has become so memorable and ubiquitously known, it even has its own network TV adaptation.

But what if the danger is rooted less in the physical, and more in one's mental health?

Since a pair of shooters opened fire Tuesday in Jersey City, N.J., the state's attorney general, Gurbir Grewal, had been reluctant to label the assault on a local kosher market specifically as an anti-Semitic act. As recent as Wednesday afternoon, even after identifying the shooters, Grewal said authorities were still not in a position to definitively assign a motive.

By Thursday, though, he was ready to say it.

Just more than a week after Germany announced the expulsion of two Russian diplomats, citing evidence of a state-sponsored contract killing in Berlin, the Russian government has retaliated in kind.

The country's Foreign Ministry announced Thursday that, "guided by the reciprocity principle," it was declaring two members of the German diplomatic mission in Moscow to be personae non gratae.

Updated at 7:41 p.m. ET

The shootings that left at least three civilians and one police officer dead Tuesday in Jersey City, N.J., was a targeted attack, according to local authorities. Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop explained Wednesday that the pair of shooters, who were also killed, had clearly singled out the kosher market on which they opened fire.

Updated at 7:02 p.m. ET

Six people, including one police officer, were killed Tuesday in Jersey City, N.J., during a shooting at a cemetery and in a gunbattle in a local market that lasted for hours.

There were two separate shooting incidents beginning at Bayview Cemetery, where the officer was slain, and then later at a kosher market, where five bodies were found after hours of gunfire.

Local police say the two shooting suspects, both males, and three bystanders were found dead inside the store.

There are plenty of flashpoints for controversy littered among the grand pantheon of four-letter words. Plenty of examples probably come to mind immediately — from the relatively tame ("heck," anyone?) to the kind of graphic profanity that may warrant an uncomfortable call from our ombudsman.

Still, one four-letter word has elicited more heated debate than most among grammarians lately. And it happens to be one that we're free to print right here: they.

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