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Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4am - 9am
  • Hosted by Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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When Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday, the nation lost a Supreme Court justice and a pop culture figure. Here's NPR's Andrew Limbong.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE")

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The mother of Breonna Taylor says that if the police reforms announced this week by officials in Louisville were in place six months ago, her daughter might still be alive.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black woman who worked as an emergency room technician, was fatally shot by Louisville police during a botched narcotics raid at her home during the early morning hours of March 13.

A decision on whether to bring charges against the three officers who carried out the raid is expected in the coming days.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

So starting this Sunday, the mobile apps TikTok and WeChat will be banned from U.S. app stores. That was the announcement from the U.S. Commerce Department today. The Chinese-owned apps have been the target of the Trump administration. They say the apps collect data from American users that could be accessed by the Chinese government. A sale of TikTok has been in the works, but so far, no deal has been finalized. And let's turn to NPR's Bobby Allyn, who's been following this story. Good morning, Bobby.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Hey, David.

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