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Both Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Anita Hill became cultural figures in their fight for gender equality. In the aftermath of Justice Ginsburg's death, Hill says, "her legacy is so large."

Federal authorities are investigating after ricin, a deadly toxin, was discovered in mail intended for the White House.

The Secret Service intercepted the envelope which was positively identified with mail meant for the White House, law enforcement sources tell NPR. The ricin never made it to White House grounds, but authorities are still searching for other undiscovered dangerous packages that may be linked to the ricin.

Law enforcement sources also said investigators are narrowing down suspects, but have made no arrests.

Supreme Court justices, both current and former, are remembering their colleague Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday at the age of 87.

"Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature. We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her — a tireless and resolute champion of justice," wrote Chief Justice John Roberts in a statement Friday.

President Trump says that he expects to announce a nominee to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death "next week" and that the pick will likely be a woman.

"A choice of a woman would certainly be appropriate," he told reporters at the White House on Saturday before leaving for a campaign rally in North Carolina.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with David Kaplan, former legal affairs editor for Newsweek and author of The Most Dangerous Branch, about the political fight to fill Justice Ginsburg's vacant seat.

Many Jews learned that Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the first Jewish woman on the Supreme Court, had passed while they were listening to Rosh Hashanah services.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks wtih Fatima Goss Graves, president and CEO of the National Women's Law Center, about what Justice Ginsburg's legacy means for women and reproductive rights in the U.S.

Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins says the nomination of a Supreme Court justice to fill the vacancy left by the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg should be made by whichever candidate wins the presidential election.

With Republican leadership united behind President Trump's decision to quickly nominate a new Supreme Court justice to fill the vacancy left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death on Friday, Senate Democrats are hoping to block a vote by swaying a few moderate Republicans to their side.

Updated at 7:28 p.m. ET

Judges Amy Coney Barrett, Barbara Lagoa and Allison Jones Rushing are emerging as serious contenders to fill the seat on the Supreme Court vacated by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, according to sources familiar with the process.

An announcement on the nominee could come as early as Monday or Tuesday.

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