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Eve Zuckoff

Eve Zuckoff is WCAI's Report for America reporter, covering the human impacts of climate change.  

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The pandemic has taken a toll on people's mental health. A new CDC report says that toll has been much higher for unpaid caregivers, those taking care of loved ones. NPR's Rhitu Chatterjee has the story.

RHITU CHATTERJEE, BYLINE: Amy Adams lives in Seneca, Ill. Last December her mother, who lives nearby, suffered a heart attack and ended up in the hospital, needing bypass surgery. But Adams wasn't allowed to see her.

North Atlantic right whales now grow smaller than they did 40 years ago, and new research suggests a leading cause is the damage human activity inflicts on the critically endangered mammals.

The findings, published today in the journal Current Biology, reveal that when fully grown, a North Atlantic right whale born today would be expected to be about one meter shorter than a whale born in 1980. Currently, full-grown members of the species average 13 to 14 meters in length (43 to 46 feet).

After three decades of fishing for lobsters in Cape Cod Bay in Massachusetts, Rob Martin knows his boat inside and out.

"It's only 40 feet. It was big when I first got it and now it seems small," he says while warming up inside the cabin on a cold morning.

Just as Cape Cod lobstermen have done for centuries, Martin used to check his traps by looking for buoys connected to cages on the ocean floor by ropes.

But his buoys are gone and he is one of a handful of Massachusetts lobstermen testing ropeless fishing systems.

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