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Mia Venkat

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For millions of people, this phrase...

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QUINTA BRUNSON: (As character) He got money.

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The first time sociologist Mary de Young heard about QAnon, she thought: "Here we go again."

De Young spent her career studying moral panics — specifically, what became known as the "Satanic Panic" of the 1980s, when false accusations of the abuse of children in satanic rituals spread across the United States.

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Earlier this week, the white police officer involved in the killing of an unarmed Black man was convicted in a Minneapolis courtroom.

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